Life in a Secular Culture

A very worthwhile read from Rick Wade and Probe Ministries regarding the effect that secular culture has on Christians.

An excerpt of the article is below. 

“We get our cues about how to live from the society in which we live. Maybe I should say the “societies” in which we live since, in this day and age, we can find ourselves moving back and forth between very different worlds. Christians belong to the mini-societies of our churches which might extend beyond the walls of our church to define our friendships, our social lives. We also live and work and play in a secular society which is sending us messages constantly about how to live, how to talk, what to wear; in short, what is important in life.

“Secular” means that which is defined apart from anything religious. The late Peter Berger, a sociologist, put it this way: “By secularization we mean the process by which sectors of society and culture are removed from the domination of religious institutions and symbols…. It affects the totality of cultural life and of ideation.” In other words, secularism works its fingers into all of life, including the ideas we hold. Secularization also refers the consciousness of individuals who decreasingly view the world with a religious perspective. So the influence of religion declines in society and in us individually as we think about life with less—or with no—reference to God. {1}

Without God shaping its vision, what does our society teach us about how to think and act? Think about it. How are we shaped by the culture in which we live? Just identifying a few things can be a start to combating the corrosive effects of secularism in our lives.”

To read the full article click here.

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3 Responses to Life in a Secular Culture

  1. Tom Moore says:

    “Secular” means that which is defined apart from anything religious.

    It is the nature of a secular government, as described in our constitution and founding documents, to be secular as you have defined it here. This is something that is regrettable only to the advocates of specific religious credos. But that’s the point: a democratic government must be free of ANY religious elements, so that its citizens are free to hold any religious beliefs under that government.

    The fact that secular thinking can effectively replace any and all religious thinking with reality-based spirituality does not make it a candidate for prohibition on the same grounds as religion. The thing that makes it different is that it is non-dogmatic and

  2. Tom Moore says:

    Hit the submit button accidentally, and cannot edit:

    … based on democratic human consensus, which is changing and evolving rather than being derived from “revealed truth”. That’s is most definitely not religion, and thus exempt from the religious prohibition in government.

  3. Chris says:

    You are correct in your definition of the term secular but completely wrong about everything else.

    First, America was not founded on secularism. It was founded on Judeo-Christian principles.

    Second, have you veer been to D.C.? There are Bible verses and other symbols of America’s Christian heritage all over the monuments. You might not like it but it is the truth.

    Third, I have no clue what you mean by”secular thinking can effectively replace any and all religious thinking with reality-based spirituality”? This makes no sense at all. Please explain further.

    Fourth, I have no clue what you mean by “The thing that makes it different is that it is non-dogmatic and based on democratic human consensus, which is changing and evolving rather than being derived from “revealed truth”? This makes no sense either. Please explain further.

    There is no question that secularism (or some call it humanism or naturalism) is every bit as much a religion as theism. Even major proponents of secularism have stated it is a religion.

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